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Triumph66

Bolens Ploughing

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3 minutes ago, Triumph66 said:

What I find odd is that there are no hedgerows at all!

Hedgerows are not seen when they are miles apart, plots are even bigger out west. This was in western Pennsylvania, In Nebraska you mas see fields that are thousands of acres. Here's a vido of plowing in my side field that has always been horse/cow pasture

 

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1 hour ago, C-101plowerpower said:

doesn't look like they're on proper plowing depth, the red ones are can do that too:lol:

plowing depth depends on the soil as well

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4 hours ago, Triumph66 said:

What I find odd is that there are no hedgerows at all!

Population density, smaller geographical area, and an established society that dates back nearly a thousand years probably has a lot to do with stone walls and hedgerows. In the Western states cattle ranchers might kill a man that put up a fence, especially a barb wire fence in the later part of the 19th century. Americans don't like to be fence in or out. Its one of the problems with them, you cant keep them anywhere for long, easier to herd cats.

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In certain parts of the agricultural USA areas you must have severe soil erosion as the hedgerows reduces solid erosion and acts as a filtered wind break. In certain parts of France, you can see miles upon miles of sweeping agricultural lands with very few hedgerows. 

 

As as a rule of thumb, the more species of shrubs and trees, within a given length of hedge, the older the hedge is. In theory, if you have 10 different species, then the hedge is approximately 1000 years old which is often evidenced by old maps dating back to the 15 century.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Triumph66 said:

In certain parts of the agricultural USA areas you must have severe soil erosion as the hedgerows reduces solid erosion and acts as a filtered wind break. In certain parts of France, you can see miles upon miles of sweeping agricultural lands with very few hedgerows. 

 

As as a rule of thumb, the more species of shrubs and trees, within a given length of hedge, the older the hedge is. In theory, if you have 10 different species, then the hedge is approximately 1000 years old which is often evidenced by old maps dating back to the 15 century.

 

 

Yes, look at the erosion being carried out in "Pale Rider" :D

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13 hours ago, Triumph66 said:

In certain parts of the agricultural USA areas you must have severe soil erosion as the hedgerows reduces solid erosion and acts as a filtered wind break. In certain parts of France, you can see miles upon miles of sweeping agricultural lands with very few hedgerows. 

 

As as a rule of thumb, the more species of shrubs and trees, within a given length of hedge, the older the hedge is. In theory, if you have 10 different species, then the hedge is approximately 1000 years old which is often evidenced by old maps dating back to the 15 century.

 

 

Erosion is quelled by contour farming here, you in the UK get strong and sometime relentless winds off the ocean, and while winds from the north plague our plains, the contour farming and the planting of cover crops takes care of much of the problem. The real problem here and in the rest of the world is not so much erosion, but desertification of the soil caused by fertilizer that adds salinity to the soil. Case in point, one of the largest inland bodies of water, the Aral sea, has been nearly drained to supply water to agricultural lands in nearby countries and regions, the lowering of the sea has exposed salt deposits which are carried by the wind and blown onto those agricultural areas and rendering them nearly infertile. Agriculture problems and issues are so varied from region to region and country to country it is nearly impossible to use the same solutions everywhere. When the plow was first developed in the fertile crescent of the middle east it was made of wood and worked well because the land and soil was easy to turn and was not of the density of European soils and did not contain much clay. When farming expanded to northern Europe iron plows were introduced to turn a different kind of soil.

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1 hour ago, C-101plowerpower said:

 

yes i did, don't think its usefull tho

I was wondering if it would be or not. My friend uses a GPS it to return to good fishing spots and my wife's car has one as standard equipment. I wont use them, they aren't that accurate or useful to me. I use Rand MacNally and/or google earth/maps.

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