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What lathe have you got?

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Very nice. :thumbs:  Did you get 4 jaw and face plate as well, plus tools?

 

Theres plently of bits with it, inc chucks 3 or 4 at the last count. Not checked to see how many jaws they have. There is a face plate if thats what I think it is!

 

Enough cutters, drills etc to last me years. Not that I will ever wear this out

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This lathe is in the back workshop, weighs the best part of 4tonnes on its own.

Going to have the pleasure of moving this out the workshop, across a muddy track, around two corners then across the estate to a new unit next week, should be fun!

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I have a Drummond lathe that dates back to 1902, it was used for model making and only has a small keyless chuck . Does anyone have a 6" chuck available I could mount on to a backplate?

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I have a Drummond lathe that dates back to 1902, it was used for model making and only has a small keyless chuck . Does anyone have a 6" chuck available I could mount on to a backplate?

Somehow I missed this post of yours. A 1902 Drummond must be one of the earliest machines produced by Drummond as a formed company?. I for one would like to see a pic of it on here if possible .

 

It's probably of no help to you, but my 6" 4 jaw independent chuck is the Slim body version, direct threaded (Myford 1.1/8"x 12 whit) with no Back Plate and a metal relieved back face to reduce weight.

It allows the Chuck to screw straight onto the Spindle with little overhang, reducing load on the spindle etc.

If you can find one of those, I'm sure that would be the best option and make the adaptor to fit both threads.

 

If I am correct, the Drummond Spindle nose of that date is threaded 3/4" x10tpi Whitworth ?.    

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This lathe is in the back workshop, weighs the best part of 4tonnes on its own.

Had the pleasure on Thursday of moving this to its new home, a purpose built lathe room, took two forklifts working in tandem, round a couple of corners, over some rough terrain, then a giant speed bump, followed by yet more corners. Just got to properly level it now.

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Hi all,

 

I have upgraded from my small lathe as you have probably seen to a bit of a bigger one :D Photos to follow tomorrow.. I had one question for all you lathe users though, do you have coolant set-ups? I am tempted to set one up as there is a tank in the cabinet for it but I don't really want to use a water-based coolant as I'm presuming it will just rust everything up unless I clean it meticulously. I don't want to set one up if it's pointless but I just thought if the tank is there all I need is a pump and some pipe.. What do you guys use if you do have coolant setups?

 

Tom

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Hi Tom,

The best,but not cheapest,coolant I have used is a synthetic used mainly for grinding machines, I use it in the lathe and the cut off saw. It doesn't suffer from the usual smell that the normal  'white' emulsion does as it degrades after a while, you don't usually have rust problems with the emulsion,but you can get 'staining' on the bed etc, if you allow it to lay between surfaces for a while if not used, the synthetic doesn't seem to have this problem. I think the brand is 'Rocal' It is very long lasting, I usually just top up with water as it evaporates,I have a dehumidifier running all the time in the 'shed',have done for years, and don't have any rust problems on any thing in there,even welding rods or wire.

  Doug.

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Apologies Richard ( Anglo Traction) I have just read your response from April. You are right about the Whitworth Thread, I managed to find a back plate, Rhys found me a chuck and the lathe is now up and running and in use making a new set of head studs for 137.

I recently came across another Model B which is treadle powered. I bought mine about 35 years ago as a present for my father, it used to belong to a vicar in Lockerbie who was a keen  model steam engine builder. When my father died I brought it home and set it up. I have managed to buy a few later attachments for it, a compound cross slide and a milling attachment and very fortunately an original brass plate that gives you the gear configurations for the lead screw drive. None of which I have yet had a play with. I will post a picture later.  

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It will have increased its usability, especially now that you don't have to faf about with the 4 jaw for bigger stuff, although with a 4 jaw zero run out is achievable if you need that kind of accuracy!

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14 hours ago, C-101plowerpower said:

when i walked into the workshop this afternoon a yellow 9x20 lathe had found its way in.

giving it a good cleanup helped establish a new frienship

 

If you're not already familiar with them, welcome to the world of Speeds, Feeds and Depths of Cut.

A whole range of ways to produce items you may need are now available to you. Enjoy!.

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My two are a Unimat 3 with mill / drill attachment which I bought for model making.  Recently used to bore out a sprocket mounted on the original face plate via a larger diameter adaptor which I made years ago. 

IMG_5461.JPGIMG_5469.JPG

 

The second is a round bed Drummond which was friend John's first lathe many years ago.  After being found in his barn, buried, rusty and seized up, it is now being SLOWLY brought back to life.  Although it looked only fit for scrap, it is cleaning up much better than expected and will do all that I need, mainly simple turning and drilling jobs. Nothing precision, just "That's close enough".  No ID plate or mounting rivet / screw holes visible anywhere.  More photo's as and when.

IMG_3089.JPGIMG_3088.JPG

 

 

 

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