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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/24/2024 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Anglo Traction

    Bits for my next Project

    Not a lot of progress, what with the cold spell of the last 3 weeks. Confined myself in the warmer environment of the Lounge. Too cold in the workshop. Have been designing and drawing up the Fuel fittings I require. Nothing 'off the shelf' will suit, so making my own and using a 1950s ATCO Pet Cock as a guide. Got some Lathe time in over last few days and started turning up a Taper Reamer blank, then a first Pet Cock plug at the same settings. Got to produce several of these so I have a stock. The taper angle is 7 degrees inclusive . The little levers that screw into the plug are threaded 5/32" Whitworth, so making them the same - Had to keep to Imperial, not easy to mix metric on these, plus I have been asked to reproduce an old Pet Cock style for a restoration. Ready to part off the finished plug from the rod and make the next one now. The reamer blank is next to finish machining the cutting edges, then harden, temper and hone. Quite pleased really, as the new plug actually fits perfectly in the old tap body, so I got the angle right. Regards.
  2. 2 points
    Wallfish

    repairing broken starter dogs

    Well, got one done anyway. Took much longer to do than anticipated. I cut some of that blue spring steel I ordered for making the carb springs. The first stuff I ordered was too thick for the carb springs and it finally found a purpose. Sliced a long thin piece off then heated and bent the edge of it into a circle to fit in the dogleg hole. Drilled out the old stuff. Put the new spring in place then dropped solder in. The bubble of solder was big so I also hammered it so it would stay very tight. Filed off the remainder and cut the spring to length. Seems to work well. UGH, only 7 more to go! I like that gun bluing stuff so I'll probably clean them all up and coat them with that too.
  3. 2 points
    JUST O&R

    rebuild another one for 2024

    hens teeth are something very hard to find if you have never seen them you properly never will . some of use have seen them and may never see them again some of us have them and do not know it . some of us don't want to see them . some of us have know idea what they are . I'm sorry I miss this I wish I had more time to do it
  4. 2 points
    Anglo Traction

    Bits for my next Project

    Finished the Fuel Taps. Lots of different set-ups and operations required. Did much of the work while still part of the parent brass rod. Cross drilling 3/8"(9.55mm)- I wanted the tap levers opposed to eachother for access (in the off position), so had to be careful when it came to drilling through with the tapered plugs fitted- . The Tap's cam limit plates had to be soldered together, then to a stub of brass for machining to shape using a rotary table- When as much work as possible was done, I cut them away from the parent bar and 'Silver Soldered' the pipe connection rods to the Tap bodies. All the fiitings are for 3/16" (4.75mm) copper pipe. The tap tapers are 'pulled in' using the correct 'Thackery' coil spring washers and provides just the right amount of resistance- A light polish and just need proper 1/16" Split (cotter) Pins to finish off. Maybe blend the joints. Happy with this first time job for me. Regards
  5. 2 points
    CNew

    Older style recoil handles

    That did “turn” out nice. I agree, the rings are a nice flare but not needed.
  6. 2 points
    Wallfish

    Muffler cold blue

    Hammer restoration huh? Man you're really getting into the crazy tech stuff. Just bust'n, please let me know how it works out.
  7. 2 points
    JUST O&R

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    I see your working at record pace did you get kicked out of the house again
  8. 2 points
    Wallfish

    Older style recoil handles

    We texted today about it and I mentioned a couple others might be interested in them too so he said he could make a template so they all come out the same. Once perfected it will be easier and faster to make them.
  9. 2 points
    Anglo Traction

    Bits for my next Project

    Thank you Gents for your positive comments. Lot of work sorting the Reduction Unit design set up. I needed to provide stanchions for the tank(s) support and location, bearing support for the fan drive, Pto clutch lever mount point and lubricator positions, all in one area. I decided on brass plates for extending up to fan shaft line. Started with an old 12 inch (305mm) square plate shown during marking out- After lot of cutting and careful drilling time, I was able to fit it and began the stiffening with bracing layout and fittng the welded and shaped stanchions. Lubrication connections made to fit into the large brass bearings, then made/fitted the mountings for the Lubricators. These Lubricators were found in an old barn in France about 15 years ago and are shown in the very first image of this Topic. Had to anneal the thick walled copper pipes, shaped to fit using a home made tube bender also shown in the image below- Had to use incompatible metals in this unit (electrolytic/galvanic reaction risk), so will have to be careful to seal the mating surfaces of the Aluminium and Brass parts, even though they will be polished and lacquered. Hoping to get this unit''s mounting plate/support welded up soon. Regards and wishing all a Happy New Year
  10. 1 point
    CNew

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    Bases turned out really nice! The green one almost looks laser cut.
  11. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    Got the bases done for both TTs. The 400 had a steel base so I just used that gun blue stuff to cover it. Made the 300 base out of aluminum sheet that I have. It's from a TD bank ATM cover so it's painted green and that paint is tough to get off so it's just going to stay for now and maybe get painted with some silver hammer tone when it gets warmer out. And here's the White Heat engine. Probably swap that Octura valve into a water cooled head engine. I have converted glow plug engines bot air and water cooled but not sure what exactly was used for the boats.
  12. 1 point
    The non-serviceable bit relates to a seal, the later type of seal that is bonded to metal ring, which can't be removed without destroying the feather valve assembly, due to the bearing being pressed in, blocking access. The service bulletin is S-E 093, which was added to this thread; They eventually made the same change to the induction housing too, must have increased profits on service parts, why change two cheap seals, when they could sell a complete new feather valve & induction housing. David
  13. 1 point
    CNew

    Muffler cold blue

    Awesome- that’s the same bluing I have. Looks great!
  14. 1 point
    CNew

    Muffler cold blue

    I’ve thought about trying that as well. I recently bought some bluing solution for a ball peen hammer restoration. Seems like it would look good.
  15. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Older style recoil handles

    I added to the last response and did a recoil repair tutorial although there will be more pics and information added. It's now a pinned topic on the main list of threads for the Ohlsson and Rice section
  16. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Recoil Repair Guide

    DO NOT DRILL OUT THE RIVET which is holding the center bearing! If it hasn't been already. The spools can be removed without destroying that rivet. If the rivet has already been drilled, that can be repaired as well but the housing will not look original anymore and will appear like it's repaired with a nut and bolt. This repair thread is for the original style recoils which are an integrated part of the blower housing. The newer type with the separate square recoil part on 13B engines will be covered separately Removing the spool- First remove the knob from the rope. Best to push and pick the rope knot out of the top and cut only that knot off. If there is still spring tension, it's easiest if a quick knot is tied about 6-8 down to keep the tension off the rope and not allow the rope to just suck in by the recoiling of the spring. After removing the knob release any tension of the spring slowly until it's neutral of any tension. There are a couple different styles of housings whereas early recoils do not utilize a retaining clip (#17) to hold the spool in. The later production recoils do have a retaining clip. The clip is a bit difficult to see and could appear just like it's the inside of the spool. That's why quite a few get the rivet drilled out but the spool will not come out if it has that retaining clip in place. See the pictures below. The retaining clip is a ring that's silver, not black like the spool is. It clips into tiny slots right near the main body of the housing. Look for the opening in the clip and that too is very small and possibly hidden from view as well. The clip is #17 in the IPL drawing. To release the clip use a small flat screwdriver to press it inwards towards the center to release it from the little slots all the way around the housing. As it's released move it towards the other side of the spool, engine side. Once the clip is loose or if there isn't one, pinch the spool with small pliers as close to the center as possible, not on the outer ring, and pull while rotating the spool back and forth. Do not pull hard enough to bend the spool. Sometimes repositioning the pliers to pinch it 180 deg from the first spot or go back and forth which seems to work better. Sometimes they come right off and sometimes they need to be worked off of that center bearing but they do pull off. Spring-- For best results and smooth operation after any repairs, the spring should be completely removed from the housing and cleaned by soaking and or wiping the old grease/oil off. Also clean the inside of the housing and the center bearing. Older recoils used a different type of clip to retain the spring. (#11) These devises are difficult to remove without bending or breaking them but it must be removed anyway to get the spring removed. Since newer models didn't use them, they still work fine without them. I have NOS #11 pieces yet haven't been successful installing one so I just skip it. Not an issue so far. Repairing a broken spring. The broken end of the spring can be re-shaped if it has broken off. Heat about 1 inch of the end of the spring until it's cherry red. I use a small butane torch but even a cigarette lighter will probably work. Let it air cool and do not quench it. That heat will remove the brittle "spring" characteristics of the steel and allow it to bend without breaking it. Below is a pic of what that bend of the spring looks like and it's fairly easy using small needle nose pliers to shape it. The shape is important so the tail remains inside the indent of the center bearing. If it protrudes out at all, the spool can not be seated back in properly. Recoiling the spring and getting it back into the housing isn't fun or always easy. It can be recoiled directly back into the housing starting from the outside in or coil the spring first and then insert it back into the housing. It's nice to have a spring holder and especially if doing a bunch of them. A holder / retainer can be made from 2" pipe which makes installation much easier. The coiled spring is loaded into it then It's simply inserted into the housing. The holder is removed while holding the spring down in the housing. After removal the spring tension must be released slowly until it's neutral. Not the best pic but the tail of the spring must fit all the way into the indent of the bearing. Otherwise the spool will not go down. The spring must slip into the slot on the spool Rope It is retained in the spool with a small wire. Remove that old wire completely or any remnants of it and find a short piece of wire about the same size to use for retaining the rope to the spool. I have used a copper strand from electrical wire because it's soft enough to manipulate to get the ends into those tiny holes on the side of the spool. Basically untwist just a single strand of the copper wire off of the larger twisted wire but it needs to be thick enough. To small and thin and it will easily break. Copper or steel or anything you can get in there should work. Even a small paper clip but I haven't tried one. Below is a pic of what the NOS repair wire looks like before it's inserted into the spool. The bend for the tips makes it easier to get into the spool holes The wire twist must bend over tight to fit in this indent of the spool otherwise it will catch on the spring Once you get that small loop of wire inserted through the holes in the side of the spool pull the tails through so there's just a small loop down inside the spool, feed and poke the end of the rope through that loop in the wire. Cut the end of the rope so it has a nice clean edge. Use a cigarette lighter or a match to heat the edge of the rope in order to seal it and keep it from fraying. It will melt and do just a little bit at a time. Just enough to melt the edges of the fibers. Once you melt the edge, quickly twist it in your fingers to keep that hardened edge the same or smaller size diameter than the the rope. Too much melted and it will be too big to fit through that wire loop. That size is important for trying to get the edge of the rope through that little loop of the wire inside the spool. I use a small pick tool to push it and pick it from the opposite side to pull it through. Once you get the rope through the wire loop pull it through enough so you can now heat the edge of the rope again. This time melt the edge of the rope so it does create a hardened edge that's bigger than the diameter of the rope. This hardened bulge on the end of the rope will prevent it from ever pulling through the retaining wire once that wire is cinched down. Now pull the retaining wire tails so the loop is just snug to the rope. Then pull the rope back through so that little bulge you created is almost snug to the retaining wire loop. Using pliers, pinch, pull and twist both tails of that retaining wire to lock the rope to the spool. Be careful not to twist too tight and break that wire or you need to start all over, but it does need to be tight enough to hold the rope snug. It's a very fine line between breaking the wire and having it tight enough. Best to go 1/2 twist at a time once it's close to being tight. After it's twisted tight and the rope is locked to the spool, cut the twisted wire tail off. Leave about 1/8 inch long of twisted wire. Then bend over that twisted tail so it fits down below the indent of the spool. Bend it to the right and the opposite way it is shown bent over in your pic but I'm not sure it makes a difference. That's how the originals are done so I just follow that. Wind the rope onto the spool. You will need to cut the knot off that retains the handle and heat the end just like before to stop the fray of fibers but keep it small enough to fit back through the handle hole. ( There should be a spring inside that type of handle) Just a hole in the newer ball type Feed the end of the rope, after it's spooled up, through one of the openings in the spool with about 3 inches or so protruding out. This will allow the spool to be installed without interfering with the edge of the housing, Now is a good time to oil the spring. Drops all around so it gets in between the coils. Insert the spool over the bearing and back into the housing. That little slot on the bottom of the spool must catch the spring and that's why it's important to have that spring bent and properly positioned. ADD INSTALLED SPRING PIC HERE There can not be any other part of the spring protruding out from the bearing which would prevent the spool from sliding all the way down and the slot catching the spring. Once the spool is down in place and caught on the spring, use that tail of the rope that's protruding up to spin the spool counter clockwise. Usually it's about 3-4 revolutions to create enough spring tension on it to recoil. Hold the tension on the spool with your thumb when the rope tail is at the top and at the location it goes through the housing and up to the handle stop. Now feed the tail of the rope back through the spool edge and out to the front of the housing. Grab it and feed the rope up through the hole in the handle stop and tie a quick knot to keep it from recoiling. If there is a # 17 retainer clip you can now use a small screwdriver to clip it back into those housing slots. This is a good time to test the action of the recoil and verify everything is working properly. Pull and release the rope quite a few times to get that spring to settle in it's proper place and disperse the oil all around it too. It should pull and retract with ease and have enough tension that it recoils all the way in. Once you are happy with the performance, tie a loose quick release knot about 8-10 inches down on the rope. This will prevent it from spooling back in while you work on the handle. Send the rope end through the little spacer first, then through the handle and then through the handle spring if there is one (Older style). One end of the spring is smaller than the other so that end is the top where the knot will hold and retain the handle. That's all there is to it! Definitely not the easiest thing for the first timer doing it!!!
  17. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Older style recoil handles

    Yes, that can be repaired. Did the little hook on the end break? I'm so glad the rivet wasn't drilled off because that's what many do believing it retains the spool. Spring-- The broken end of the spring can be re-shaped. Heat the end of it until it's cherry red. That will remove the brittle "spring" characteristics of the steel and allow it to be bent without breaking it. I will get you a pic of what that bend looks like and it's fairly easy using small needle nose pliers. For best results and smooth operation after repairs the spring should be completely removed from the housing and cleaned by soaking and or wiping the old grease/oil off. Also clean the inside of the housing. Recoiling the spring and getting it back into the housing isn't fun or always easy. It can be recoiled right back into the housing or do the coil first and insert it back into the housing. If doing a bunch of them a retainer can be made from 2" pipe which makes installation much easier. Rope Yes it's retained in the spool with the wire. Remove that old wire and find a short piece of wire about the same size to use. I have used a copper strand from electrical wire because it's soft enough to manipulate to get the ends into those tiny holes. Basically untwist just a single strand of the wire off of the larger twisted wire but anything you can get in there should work. I'll post a pic of what the NOS repair wire looks like before it's inserted into the spool. Once you get that small loop of wire inside the spool you will need to poke the end of the rope through it and pull it through. First, Cut the end of the rope so it has a nice clean edge. Use a cigarette lighter or a match to heat that edge of the rope in order to seal it and keep it from fraying. It will melt and do just a little bit at a time. Just enough to melt the edges of the fibers. Once you melt the edge quickly twist it in your fingers to keep that hardened edge the same or smaller size than the diameter of the rope. Too much melted and it will be too big to fit. This is important for trying to get the edge of the rope through that little loop of the wire. I use a small pick tool to push it and pick it from the opposite side to pull it through. Once you get the rope through the wire loop pull it through enough so you can now heat the edge of the rope again. This time melt the edge of the rope so it creates a hardened edge that's bigger than the diameter of the rope. This hardened bulge on the end of the rope will prevent it from ever pulling through the retaining wire once that wire is cinched down. Now pull the retaining wire tails so the loop is just snug to the rope. Then pull the rope back through so that little bulge you created is almost snug to the retaining wire loop. Using pliers pull and twist the 2 tails of that retaining wire to lock the rope to the spool. Be careful not to twist too tight and break that wire or you need to start all over, but it does need to be tight to hold the rope so it has no movement at all. It's a very fine line between breaking the wire and having tight enough. Best to go 1/2 twist at a time once it's close to being tight. Once it's twisted tight and the rope is locked to the spool, cut the twisted wire tail off. Leave about 1/8 inch long of twisted wire Then bend over that twisted tail so it fits down below the indent of the spool. Bend it to the right and the opposite way it is shown bent over in your pic but I'm not sure it makes a difference. That's how the originals are done so I just follow that. Wind the rope onto the spool. You will need to cut the knot off that retains the handle and heat the end just like before to stop the fray of fibers but keep it small enough to fit back through the handle hole. ( There should be a spring inside that type of handle) Just a hole in the newer ball type Feed the end of the rope, after it's spooled up, through one of the openings in the spool with about 3 inches or so protruding out. This will allow the spool to be installed without interfering with the edge of the housing, Insert the spool over the bearing and back into the housing. That little slot on the bottom of the spool must catch the spring and that's why it's important to have that spring bent and properly positioned. It should look just like your pic but it must have the bend in it to catch the spool. There can not be any other part of the spring touching or protruding out from the bearing which would prevent the spool from sliding all the way down and the slot catching the spring. Once the spool is down in place and caught on the spring, use that tail of the rope that's protruding up to spin the spool counter clockwise. Usually it's about 3-4 revolutions to create enough spring tension on it to recoil. Hold the tension on the spool with your thumb when the rope tail is at the top and at the location it goes through the housing and up to the handle stop. Now feed the tail of the rope back through the spool edge and out to the front of the housing. Grab it and feed the rope up through the hole in the handle stop. This is a good time to test the action of the recoil and verify everything is working properly but hold that rope tight. Pull and release the rope quite a few times to get that spring to settle in it's proper place. It should pull and retract with ease and have enough tension that it recoils all the way in. Once you are happy with the performance, tie a loose quick release knot about 6-8 inches down on the rope. This will prevent it from spooling back in while you work on the handle. Send the rope end through the little spacer first, then through the handle and then through the handle spring if there is one. One end of the spring is smaller than the other so that end is the top where the knot will hold and retain the handle. That's all there is to it! Definitely not the easiest thing for the first time doing it This may be a good opportunity and time to make a completely new Recoil Repair Tutorial thread for others to follow as well. It's something I've been meaning to do for a while now. I'll get some stuff together and do one with pics and maybe some video to help explain things. These are NOT that fun to work with and it's one of my least favorite things to work on as they can be frustrating when starting out and doing one for the first time. Much of what was written is is easier said than done and it's a learning curve for sure. They do get much easier to do the more that are done but most people don't have a large collection and just need one or two done. Just don't smash it with a hammer under the frustration! LOL NOS recoil spring bend for center. Notice the tail curves a little. That's to keep it inside the indent of the center bearing That's how they come NOS, in that retainer which makes them fairly easy to install. They can be done without the retainer as well.. but use your thumb to control the unwind speed so it's slow Here's a retainer made from 2 inch pipe
  18. 1 point
    JUST O&R

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    I don't think I've ever seen one ether. I wonder if there is one in the boat engine that I have?
  19. 1 point
    CNew

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    That’s really cool that you have the Octura valve! I’ve never seen one of those before.
  20. 1 point
    CNew

    rebuild another one for 2024

    Band strap turned out great! You’re cruising through these engines. Not sure I’ve seen that particular TT, very cool!
  21. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Tiny Tiger model 400 rebuild

    Upon opening the engine I saw this. A strange valve setup so I stared at it a bit confused as I can't recall ever seeing this before and was also questioning my memory. Well, as it turns out it's one of those rare and coveted Octura made valves. Strange that it would be on a TT 400 but maybe they ordered them for manufacturing these???? Maybe David @factory might have some insight on this. Unfortunately there's no model number stamped into it and the air baffle is a clean one so obviously changed.
  22. 1 point
    Wallfish

    Older style recoil handles

    David @factory might be able to help you since he's much closer. Good recoil assemblies are something I'm short on for the engines I have. Many come ruined or missing on used engines. They do pop up on ebay every once in a while but they usually sell quick if it's a reasonable price. But I do have some NOS and used springs. The springs can be changed. Please don't drill out the rivet to remove the spool if you haven't already. The spool will come off by pulling and twisting it but later models do have a retaining clip deep inside there which is difficult to see. We can help you on how to repair the recoil you have and it's also possible to rework the existing spring depending upon it's condition. If the rivet was drilled, that can also be repaired. If you can post some pics of your recoil that might help to determine if it's salvageable.
  23. 1 point
    Wallfish

    rebuild another one for 2024

    Only Jan and already got 4 engines rebuilt so far this winter. The Amp Champ in the other thread is done, the snow blower gearbox engine in this thread, plus these other 2 in the pic with the blower engine. The guy across the street is going to spin up some of the recoil handles on his wood lathe. So now it's time to start putting these rebuilt engines on some tools and then get started rebuilding those engines or I might keep those tool engines together with the tools. IDK yet
  24. 1 point
    pmackellow

    Stationary Engine Magazine

    The latest copy of Stationary Engine magazine arrived today, complete with a small article on some of our Ohlsson Rice machines...
  25. 1 point
    Anglo Traction

    Bits for my next Project

    Had some lathe and milling machine time in recently. Started on the wheel for the front caster. Had barely enough 40mm dia EN8 Steel to make the hub and leave enough for the drive coupling. Had to work really close to the chuck jaws, which was going fine with light feed, then I noticed the 'in-feed' movement of the parting tool went 'light' and easier !. I withdrew the tool and found it had failed !. As I bought it in a modestly priced set 38 years ago and just lightly stoned the cutting edge now and again, it has served me very well- I finished off with a narrow HSS type with no issues. Indexed and drilled for the spokes on the Mill with barely 1.5mm clearance between rotary table wheel and chuck ! - Also added an angled grease point and made the bronze bushes to be pressed in later- I decided to keep the original engine output drive clutch bell and make a driven plate to replace the original Mower Clutch plates to form a coupling. This would allow for any tiny misalignment of the engine and the reducton unit. The load transfered through this part will be much less than it was orignally handling in a Mower, but I wanted it to be efficient and reliable. Ordered a 105mm x 4mm laser cut mild Steel disc and meanwhile, I made 6 bronze wear pads - The slitting saw used is only 0.0125" (0.3mm) thick. These pads were soldered to the dog spokes of the plate where they will contact the recesses in the clutch bell. The plate was then set up to drill the 6 HT fixing screws to the boss- Once I had cut the keyway in the boss, I pressed the plate with the drilled and countersunk holes onto the boss and finished fitting the screws. i need to file out the keyway in the plate to depth. The bell drive recesses needed weld metal added where they were worn from mowing since 1954, but were not bad at all - The caster wheel is at the final assembly stage. My reasons for using surplus thick walled steel tubing for the rim left over from my previous Water Cart wheel making becomes clear. It all fits and allows me to re-use the wheel jig for accurate assembly ! - Regards
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