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Joe the small engine man

what sparkplug

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hi there I have always had a J8C champion copper plus sparkplug in my wheel horse 16HP kohler! But I bought a second hand head of Alian and I placed my sparkplug in it and the end of the sparkplug is about 0.2-0.3 cm from the end of the hole. usually when I see sparkplugs in lawn mowers/ any small engine equipment  I have worked on in my shop the spark plug is either flush with the end on the hole or sticking out in the engine, just wondered if the sparkplug is ok as is as it works in the engine I have, but is it the right one?

 

Regards Joe

 


What do you use in your 16HP?

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The specified Plug for your engine is Champion RH10C or equivalent. Plugs are graded by temperature i.e. Hot, Med or Cold.

RH10C is a cold plug which means the Electrode is partially confined in the Threaded plug bore and does not protrude into the Combustion Chamber.

A Cold Plug offers a reduction in the risk of Pre Ignition and is suited to non performance engine types.

Here's a link to cross reference Plug types and Brands for the equivalents-

 

 http://www.sparkplug-crossreference.com/convert/CHAMP_PN/RH10C  

 

Hope this helps.

Regards

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The specified Plug for your engine is Champion RH10C or equivalent. Plugs are graded by temperature i.e. Hot, Med or Cold.

RH10C is a cold plug which means the Electrode is partially confined in the Threaded plug bore and does not protrude into the Combustion Chamber.

A Cold Plug offers a reduction in the risk of Pre Ignition and is suited to non performance engine types.

Here's a link to cross reference Plug types and Brands for the equivalents-

 

 http://www.sparkplug-crossreference.com/convert/CHAMP_PN/RH10C  

 

Hope this helps.

Regards

 

Strictly speaking, that is not correct . An extended nose plug may be either hot or cold as may be a plug where the insulator surrounding the centre electrode is more or less flush with the plug body.

The determining factor that defines whether a plug is hot or cold is the length of the insulator in contact within  the plug body. The more of the space taken up equates to greater ability to loose heat  - a colder running plug; and the bigger the gap  the lesser ability too loose heat - a hotter running plug.

This may explain it better.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=spark+plug+heat+range&biw=1056&bih=517&tbm=isch&imgil=DLDOcbaAbYAYwM%253A%253ByX0f1R9azGsEmM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.ngksparkplugs.com%25252Ftech_support%25252Fspark_plugs%25252Fp2.asp&source=iu&pf=m&fir=DLDOcbaAbYAYwM%253A%252CyX0f1R9azGsEmM%252C_&usg=__QcAYcQbjmU596N6UNUSx2RCfz6U%3D&ved=0CDgQyjdqFQoTCKLszsvu9MgCFQLQGgodE1wGQA&ei=T_o4VuKIL4Kga5O4mYAE#imgrc=DLDOcbaAbYAYwM%3A&usg=__QcAYcQbjmU596N6UNUSx2RCfz6U%3D

 

On Edit, Found this which may be of help

 

http://progreengrass.com/kohler-engine-spark-plug-application-chart/

Edited by Wristpin

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i don't get it, what are the points of these puns

The point is that it shows creativity and imagination in replying to a very electric topic. Feel free to hit on all cylinders.

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